The 1930s dating

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The flapper culture is perhaps the best example of the type of life that many of them aspired to.

Flappers (flapper, [flapper] were young, independent, brash, and sometimes more than a little bit "naughty", at least compared to what their family back on the farm expected.

Their presence and existence became readily more apparent because they were granted more freedom than previous generations ever were. They were given a chance to redefine the ways things were done in America.

One of the conventions they put a new spin on, and consequently revolutionize, is the idea and practice of dating.

For the most part, banks were unregulated and uninsured.

As in the play "Thoroughly Modern Millie", millions of young women left the safety and security of rural, small-town life and went to live an independent life in the big city.Some of the most frequent collocates for flappers in COHA are dress, hair, blond, smoking, flat-chested, and chic, all of which make sense.In the sections that follow, I first look at some of the (slang) terms that were new in the 1920s, which were used to describe these new women.And then I turn to new words that refer to the changing relationship between men and women at this time.As discussed in the book Dewdroppers, Waldos, and Slackers: A decade-by-decade guide to the vanishing vocabulary of the twentieth century (Ostler) there were a number of new terms for women in the 1920s, which reflected the news ways in which they were being viewed by others in society.Over the next nine years, Roosevelt’s New Deal created a new role for government in American life.

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